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When I published No Logo a decade and a half ago, readers were shocked to learn of the abusive conditions under which their clothing and gadgets were manufactured. But we have since learned to live with it – not to condone it, exactly, but to be in a state of constant forgetfulness. Ours is an economy of ghosts, of deliberate blindness.

Naomi Klein in The Guardian. Climate change is the fight of our lives – yet we can hardly bear to look at it

We’re products of an industrial project, a project linked to fossil fuels. But humans have changed before and can change again

This Changes Everything

(via protoslacker)

Luke Cage was created in 1972.

Four years earlier, in 1968, Martin Luther King, Jr. was shot and killed.

Five years before that, in 1963, Medgar Evers was shot and killed.

Eight years before that, in 1955, a young Black man named Emmett Till was tortured, then shot and killed.

These events, and numerous others with frightening similarity, happened in a line, and in the early years of the first decade to reap the social benefits of the Civil Rights Movement, Marvel Comics gives the fans (and the world) a Black male superhero whose primary superhuman aspect… is that he’s bulletproof.

Not flight, or super speed, or a power ring.

The superhuman ability of being impervious to bullets.

Superheroes. Action heroes. Fantasy heroes.

Power fantasies.

Is there any doubt the power fantasy of the Black man in the years following multiple assassinations of his leaders and children by way of the gun would be superhuman resistance to bullets?

In American society, the Black man has come a long way from the terrors of the past handful of centuries, only to crash right into the terrors of the 21st century. Some of those terrors being the same exact ones their grandparents had to face and survive — or not.

There are Black men who are wealthy, powerful, formidable and/or dangerous. They can affect change undreamt of by their parents, and their parents’ parents. Their children will be able to change the world in ways we can intuit and others we can barely begin to try and predict.

But a bullet can rip through their flesh and their future with no effort whatsoever.

And so we look at Luke Cage, a man who gets shot on a regular basis, whose body language is such that he is expecting to be shot at, prepared for the impact — because he knows he can take it.

And maybe, in the subconscious of the uni-mind of Marvel Comics, is the understanding that Luke Cage may unfortunately always be a relevant fantasy idea for the Black man.

2012 – Trayvon Martin is shot and killed.

2013 – Jonathan Ferrell is shot and killed.

2014 – Michael Brown is shot and killed.

2015/2016 – Luke Cage premieres on Netflix.

I look forward to seeing if the Luke Cage of that show will have a true understanding of his power and what he symbolizes.

Real Life Proves Why Luke Cage Endures (via comicberks)

Reading that was like getting kicked in the gut. And yet it feels like that’s not enough.

(via optimysticals)

Damn.

(Source: fyeahlilbit3point0)

jessehimself:

atane:

nerdscloset:

Miles Davis covered in blood after an altercation with police

"Altercation" sounds so polite, like it was a mutual thing and not one man getting assaulted by the police. Miles got beat up by the police.

The cops assaulted Miles because he was black. He was standing outside Birdland where he just performed and was taking a break. His name was on the marquee. They saw him escort a white female friend from the club into a taxi and then they approached him after as he was taking a smoke break. The cops told him to “move on”. Miles said he was playing at the club and was on break. They weren’t hearing any of that. One cop then punched him in the stomach, while another one cracked him on the head with a nightstick. That’s why he’s covered in blood. He was a victim of police brutality.

been my twitter background for ages

partycops:

SHUT DOWN HUMANITY WE HAVE REACHED THE BEST WE WILL EVER BE

LOL

(Source: snerky)

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